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Atomos releases beta version of Atomos Edit Browser Based Video Editing

Atomos Edit - Browser Based Video Editing
Atomos Edit - Browser Based Video Editing

Atomos has released a beta version of Atomos Edit , a cloud  based video editing platform called Cloud Studio. Unlike traditional non-linear editing software such as Premiere Pro, Davinci Resolve, Final Cut, and others, Atomos Edit only requires an internet connection, a browser, and a Cloud Studio subscription.

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Key Features

  • Timeline with multiple audio and video tracks
  • Multi-user editing with the ability to lock the timeline
  • Co-approval of layouts
  • Confidently upload and work with large files
  • Using various effects and transitions
  • Advanced export options for social media content
  • Import stock videos from various libraries, including free ones

The main idea of ​​the application is obvious – the service allows you to transfer footage from Atomos Ninja V, Ninja V + and CONNECT devices to the cloud right on the set and immediately start editing, and then publish the content. To do this, you need the Internet, any computer and a browser. The company also says that if you later need professional editing, you can transfer the created work to a powerful studio computer into a desktop editing program using XML data from Atomos Edit.

To use the beta version, Atomos recommends using Chrome or Firefox.

What about the prices?

Subscription prices are up to $50 per month.

At the moment, it is not entirely clear how many people can be in a team, what is the disk quota for downloading files, which files can be downloaded, which codecs to use, and so on. 

From my own experience, I can say how difficult it is to switch from one editing program to another, in my case it was the transition from Premiere Pro to Resolve. The programs are complex and deep, besides, in some moments they offer a fundamentally different approach to editing, this applies to working with nodes, and animation, and working with Adobe Illustrator files, in which I create all the graphics, and so on and so on. As a result, the same projects are mounted here and there, creating confusion. Atomos essentially offers a third approach, which is likely to be convenient for users of branded devices from Atomos themselves. Nevertheless, we can say that in theory and on paper, all this looks quite interesting.

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