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Microsoft accidentally released a new version of Windows

MICROSOFT ACCIDENTALLY RELEASED A NEW VERSION OF WINDOWS

Microsoft is hard at work on the next version of Windows, codenamed Next Valley for now. Earlier there was news that the company intends to return to a three-year release cycle for new versions of the operating system, with the next release scheduled for 2024. During the Ignite Keynote conference, some developers noticed an updated version of the Windows user interface, which was shown with a floating taskbar, system icons in the top right corner, and another floating search box in the top center. Many foreign publications have already written that this is a design concept for the next version of Windows.

Many publications are inclined to believe that this is a design concept for the next version of Windows, codenamed Next Valley.
Many publications are inclined to believe that this is a design concept for the next version of Windows, codenamed Next Valley.

Windows Central editor Zac Bowden confirmed that the new interface image is in line with the goals and design ideas that Microsoft hopes to achieve in the next version of its operating system. This was told to him by sources familiar with the plans of the company. In addition, he has previously seen a prototype of the Next Valley interface design, which matches what was shown on Ignite Keynote.

Zach Bowden noted that the company has several design layout options, including one where system icons/items are placed at the top in a translucent bar. Microsoft also has plans for bigger interface updates that weren’t shown on Ignite Keynote, including a new login screen, notification center, and more.

As for the version shown at the conference, it aims to create an interface that is better optimized for touch control, taking into account the possibility of traditional use of the system using a mouse and keyboard. This is exactly what Microsoft intended to do, which is to transform the interface into different form factors, including foldable devices.

Microsoft has always tried to strike a balance between users who own touchscreen devices and traditional PCs. For example, Windows 8 was heavily touch-centric, while Windows 10 was mouse-and-keyboard-centric. Windows 11 tries to balance but leans more towards traditional management. It’s too early to judge what the next version of Windows will be, as there’s nothing but design prototypes yet. A lot can change before the operating system is announced.